Apple tells the FBI to F**K OFF when they try to bully them

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From Controversial Times:

In case you haven’t heard the FBI is having a tough… well, impossible time, unlocking the iPhone that belonged to the San Bernardino Islamic terrorists.

Obviously, the information on that phone could possible point agents to other terrorist operations or have insight into the operation that was carried out in San Bernardino.

However, Apple’s protection software is apparently so good that even the FBI can’t crack it. The FBI and a US Court have basically ordered Apple to help obtain data from the phone. Apple says the only way to do so would be to introduce a de facto backdoor into the phone’s software, something that Apple has absolutely refused to do until this point.

Image: Apple, FBI, and Mike Deerkoski Creative Commons, Attribution 2.0

Cook lays out Apple’s current stance on their encryption algorithms:

Compromising the security of our personal information can ultimately put our personal safety at risk. That is why encryption has become so important to all of us.

For many years, we have used encryption to protect our customers’ personal data because we believe it’s the only way to keep their information safe. We have even put that data out of our own reach, because we believe the contents of your iPhone are none of our business.

Then he talks about the San Bernardino case specifically:

We were shocked and outraged by the deadly act of terrorism in San Bernardino last December. We mourn the loss of life and want justice for all those whose lives were affected. The FBI asked us for help in the days following the attack, and we have worked hard to support the government’s efforts to solve this horrible crime. We have no sympathy for terrorists.

When the FBI has requested data that’s in our possession, we have provided it. Apple complies with valid subpoenas and search warrants, as we have in the San Bernardino case. We have also made Apple engineers available to advise the FBI, and we’ve offered our best ideas on a number of investigative options at their disposal.

This is where things get a bit dicey:

We have great respect for the professionals at the FBI, and we believe their intentions are good. Up to this point, we have done everything that is both within our power and within the law to help them. But now the U.S. government has asked us for something we simply do not have, and something we consider too dangerous to create. They have asked us to build a backdoor to the iPhone.

Specifically, the FBI wants us to make a new version of the iPhone operating system, circumventing several important security features, and install it on an iPhone recovered during the investigation. In the wrong hands, this software — which does not exist today — would have the potential to unlock any iPhone in someone’s physical possession.

Cook goes on to say that Apple is challenging this unprecedented case as they worry that it could create a dangerous legal precedent.

Opposing this order is not something we take lightly. We feel we must speak up in the face of what we see as an overreach by the U.S. government.

We are challenging the FBI’s demands with the deepest respect for American democracy and a love of our country. We believe it would be in the best interest of everyone to step back and consider the implications.

While we believe the FBI’s intentions are good, it would be wrong for the government to force us to build a backdoor into our products. And ultimately, we fear that this demand would undermine the very freedoms and liberty our government is meant to protect.

“For God and Country—Geronimo, Geronimo, Geronimo……..Geronimo E.K.I.A.” -U.S. Navy SEAL VI