Elizabeth Warren Immediately Regrets What She Said About Trump When She Gets Publicly DEMOLISHED For It On Senate Floor

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell just scalped Elizabeth Warren with a tomahawk. No peace pipe is stopping this savage! Warren received several warnings about breaking the rules of speaking and eventually she was barred her from further speaking.

When you’re warned twice and don’t listen, the third time’s the charm. Three strikes and your out. For crying out loud, Elizabeth Warren should know that rule by now, there’s a baseball team named after her in Cleveland. It would behoove her to know and follow the rules, let alone the multiple warnings.

It doesn’t help when you’re breaking the rules and talking trash about the opponent. Watching this video is like watching a nitwit argue with their teacher about the student they don’t like and why they should not get in trouble.

Watch.

Western Journalism reports -Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell shut down Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., Tuesday night during a debate on attorney general nominee Jeff Sessions, by invoking a senate rule regarding imputing negative conduct to a fellow senator.

The Democrat was fifty minutes into her remarks, during which she quoted the late Sen. Edward Kennedy saying Sessions was a “disgrace,” when McConnell invoked Senate Rule 19 (laying out the guidelines for debate), which states, in part, “No Senator in debate shall, directly or indirectly, by any form of words impute to another Senator or to other Senators any conduct or motive unworthy or unbecoming a Senator.”

Warren was first warned earlier in her remarks by the acting president of the senate, Sen. Steve Daines, R-Mont., that she was violating the rule.

At that time, the Massachusetts senator was in the middle of reading a lengthy letter from Coretta Scott King, the late widow of Dr. Martin Luther King, which she submitted to the Senate in 1986, when Sessions was nominated to become a federal district court judge by Pres. Ronald Reagan.

“The senator is reminded that it is a violation of Rule 19 of the standing rules of the Senate to ‘impute to another senator or senators any conduct or motive unworthy or becoming a senator,’” Daines said.

“This is a reminder, not pertinent necessarily to what you just shared,” he said. “However, you stated that a sitting senator is a ‘disgrace to the Department of Justice.’”

When the Massachusetts senator read that Sessions, then a U.S. district attorney in Alabama, “exhibited so much hostility to the enforcement” of voting rights laws for blacks, Daines issued his warning.

Daines made clear to the senator that just because she was quoting or referencing someone else’s view, Rule 19 still applied and then allowed her to proceed.

It wasn’t long until she was cut off and barred from speaking anymore. Two warnings and you can’t get your act together? If your message is so important, then you’ll follow the rules as to ensure your message is heard. What message have you sent by getting the cold hard boot from speaking?

Breaking the rules three times makes Elizabeth Warren look like a child. Why would democrats look up to her if she’s the one whose message is unheard thanks to her rule breaking?

There’s rules you break and rules you don’t break. Any rule that silences you is probably not a rule to break.

Sneaking an extra sandwich at work part, that’s a rule you can break.

Not following one of the government rules of engagement is not a rule you can break.

Hopefully, Pocahontas gets her act together and doesn’t embarrass democrats any more than she has in this video.

She does what the typical democrat does – focuses on the enemy instead of talking about thyself.

No wonder we have President Trump.

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