John Legend Says That The National Anthem Is “Weak” And Racist

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Celebrities are finally giving us the opinions we never asked for on the Colin Kaepernick fiasco, and they’re every bit as stupid as you’d imagine. For anyone out of the loop, the San Francisco 49ers quarterback refused to stand for the national anthem to a game (which his team then lost), justifying his actions in stating that he wouldn’t “honor a nation that oppresses black people.”

Kaepernick is so oppressed himself that he was adopted and raised by two white parents, and now boasts a salary of nearly $20 million to toss a ball around. He was specifically talking about police brutality, apparently unaware that it affects white people more than blacks.

Now, celebrity opinion has made its way into the national dialogue, and it makes about as much sense as Kaepernick.

Via The Young Cons

John Legend is now claiming that the national anthem is racist.

“For those defending the current anthem, do you really truly love that song?” Legend tweeted. “I don’t and I’m very good at singing it. Like, one of the best.”

“My vote is for America the Beautiful. Star spangled banner is a weak song anyway. And then you read this..”

Legend then linked to an article that claimed the lyrics of the national anthem “literally celebrate the murder of African-Americans.”

He’s likely making reference to the third stanza of the national anthem, which states “No refuge could save the hireling and slave. From the terror of flight or the gloom of the grave,And the star-spangled banner in triumph doth wave, O’er the land of the free and the home of the brave.”

There’s just one problem: These lyrics are describing slaves, who were, as Legend is unaware, hired by the British. This song is not about killing black slaves. It’s about fighting the enemy, who was a decorated British officer or the escaped slave hired to do his dirty work.
It is true that we no longer include that stanza when singing the nation anthem, but that’s not because of the mention of a slave. According to Encyclopedia Britannica, “The third stanza is customarily omitted out of courtesy to the British.” To the British — not slaves!
John Legend should stick to music. He’s godawful at it – but not as bad as he is at history and politics.