Pissed Eagles President Just ENRAGED All Anthem Protesters With What He’s Calling Them Now

And the idiotic Colin Kaepernick saga continues.

The Philadelphia Eagles have always had a bit of an odd history dealing with controversial players such as Kaepernick. First, they signed Michael Vick to a contract after he was sentenced to 23 months in prison for his involvement in a dogfighting ring that included killing and abusing dogs that weren’t fit to fight. And later they offered wide receiver, Riley Cooper, a contract extension after his racist tirade at a concert, in which he called a security guard a the “n word” and was caught on tape doing so. But when it comes to free agent, failed quarterback Colin Kaepernick continues to disrespect everything that stands for the very same country that’s has made him a very rich man. Eagles’ owner Jeffrey Lurie made it very clear that the ball tosser has zero chance of playing for his Seahawks. Good for him!

Lurie’s comments:

Last week, Lurie made plain his feelings for Kaepernick’s actions and words. So far, no owner has addressed Kaepernick more thoroughly. Lurie spoke for himself only, but he offered a glimpse at why other owners would hire Blaine Gabbert, Josh McCown or Mike Glennon instead of Kaepernick. “

Lurie just doesn’t like Kaepernick’s act.

Lurie frowns on anthem protests, but he can stomach them as long as they are part of a larger, pointed strategy to effect change. He isn’t a fan of alienating police and the military, or their supporters, but he’ll risk alienation as long as the offending protests have a specific point, and if the protester is willing to work to fix the problem.

It’s the anthem thing that Lurie can’t get past.

“I don’t think anybody who is protesting the national anthem … is very respectful,” Lurie said. “If that’s all their platform is, is to protest the national anthem, then what’s the proactive nature of it?”

“Anybody who wants to do proactive things, to try to reverse social injustice, I’m all in favor of. It has to be respectful,” Lurie said. “It certainly has to respect the military and the people that serve, the women and men that serve our country, emergency responders, whoever that is.”

“I applaud anybody that can find respectful ways of trying to use their platform in some way to discuss social injustice,” he said.
What people don’t seem to understand is that although Riley is a racist fool and Vick should be in prison for life, he did spend the time in prison that his sentence dictated, Kaepernick’s actions reach deeper than the other two. Vick had a disgusting secret life and like it or not calling someone a racial slur is as of today, still not an illegal act. Kaepernick, although he has been very blessed by this country, continues to make a spectacle of himself. From the people, he hangs around with to the girlfriend he chooses to have, who has been rumored to have ties to radical Islam.

Or maybe it’s not all these issues, maybe it’s just that the former quarterback just isn’t all that good.

SFGATE Reports:

But Kap’s completion rate last season was an un-Tebow-like 59.2 percent. Certainly not Tom Brady numbers, but not awful. In fact, it was nearly the same as it was during his best full seasons with the Niners in 2013 and 2014.

Yet, according to Montana, his inability to find a job “comes down to his play as much as anything.”

Let’s look at his play.

According to Nate Silver’s Five Thirty Eight site, last season Kaepernick posted a Total Quarterback Rating of 55.2, which put him at 23rd of 30 qualified passers. Again, nothing to write home about, but not terrible either.

In fact, it’s better than at least half the backups in the league, notes the Washington Post. That list includes Landry Jones, Case Keenum, Matt Barkley, Nick Foles, Scott Tolzien, Geno Smith, Paxton Lynch, Drew Stanton, Bryce Petty, Cardale Jones, Matt Schaub, Derek Anderson, Connor Cook, Brett Hundley, Ryan Mallett, Sean Mannion and Kellen Clemens.
As to the argument that Kaepernick is more a scrambling quarterback who achieved success with the read-option but doesn’t fit with today’s NFL offenses, which favor pocket QBs, he actually threw more from the pocket in 2017 and with significantly better results than he did from out of the pocket.

Five Thirty Eight found that since 1966, only one under-30 quarterback who had as good a year as Kaepernick’s 2016 went unsigned the next year — Ed Rubbert, who played on the Washington Redskins’ replacement team during the 1987 players strike before disappearing into the dustbin of pigskin history.

Back in June, Seattle Seahawks coach Pete Carroll called Kaepernick “a starter in this league” right before the team signed Austin Davis, whose most recent NFL accomplishments include being cut by Cleveland and then by Denver.

Kaepernick’s refusal to stand for the national anthem during games last season to protest social injustices sparked a nationwide controversy. Some players joined with him, while many politicians and fans chastised him.

But Montana told the Sporting News the quarterback’s protests — which Kaepernick has since ended — aren’t keeping him from getting a job.

“Everyone thinks it is the stance he took,” the Hall-of-Famer said. “One of the things you don’t look for is distractions in the locker room. You can go back to Bill Walsh and as soon as there were guys that weren’t fitting in what he was looking for, it didn’t matter how good you were. You weren’t on the team for very long. You have to have people who want the same thing, fighting for the same thing and willing to put in the time.”

So it’s not Kap’s stance, but it’s the “distractions” — which of course were caused by the stance.

That would seem to contradict reports that Kaepernick’s protests actually had the opposite effect — they brought the team closer together and galvanized it.

Montana seems to be implying that Kaepernick wasn’t “fighting for the same thing” — presumably winning — or willing to “put in the time,” which might be an allusion to a reported leak from the 49ers organization in June. An unnamed staffer supposedly said Kaepernick wouldn’t “stay late at the facility during the season like many quarterbacks routinely do” and questioned the quarterback’s work ethic.

“I want to put that to rest,” 49ers general manager John Lynch said at the time.
“We wish Colin the best and I can tell everybody out there he very much is sincere in his interest to get back in this league, and I hope it works out for him.”

It’s clear that Colin Kaepernick is no Joe Montana and never will be, but that doesn’t mean he isn’t good enough to be a backup quarterback in the NFL. The numbers say he is.

 

It’s really great seeing as how NFL viewership has in fact fallen fast because of all these rich spoiled brat player’s protests. People are pushing back against these spoiled ball tossers, but the only way this show of disrespect towards America will stop for good is when the NFL gathers enough guts and says “enough” and starts hitting these thugs where it hurts, their bank accounts. “You don’t stand, you don’t get paid.”  Just like the NFL doesn’t let its employees wear, or display, certain unapproved logos during games, they can tell them to stand the hell up for our national anthem and stop disrespecting our great nation and everything she, and us, stand for and hold dear in our hearts. Make the NFL Great Again!

Please share if you agree Kaepernick needs to go away….

Al ran for the California State Assembly in his home district in 2010 and garnered more votes than any other Republican since 1984. He’s worked on multiple political campaigns and was communications director for the Ron Nehring for California Lt. Governor campaign during the primaries in 2014. He has also held multiple positions within his local Republican Central Committee including Secretary, and Vice President of his local California Republican Assembly chapter. While also being an ongoing delegate to the California Republican Party for almost a decade.

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