SHOCKING: Suspected Clinton Murder Case EXPLODES..New Documents Show Cover-Up

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From CT

New evidence regarding the 23-year-old mystery surrounding Deputy White House counsel Vince Foster’s death by gunshot in 1993 might reveal an ugly murder cover-up leading back to Democrat presidential candidate Hillary Clinton.

For years, Foster’s death was reported as suicide by a single gunshot to the head. Newly discovered evidence from boxes stored deep in the National Archives now bring that claim into suspicion.

Documents that might blow the lid off the suicide theory included a two-page resignation letter written by Independent Council Kenneth Starr’s lead prosecutor, Miguel Rodriguez.

In his resignation letter, Rodriguez refers to photographs showing a wound on Foster’s neck — a wound that did not exist according to Starr’s official account.

In his resignation letter, dated Jan. 17, 1995, Rodriguez said he was resigning because important evidence in the investigation was being overlooked in a rush to judgment in favor of suicide and a desire to close the grand jury investigation.

Rodriguez also explained that after he produced the photographic evidence, he became a target and was internally investigated.

“I steadfastly maintained, and continue to maintain, that I, at all times, conducted myself as an experienced and trained prosecutor, with years of federal prosecutorial experience and federal grand jury experience,” he wrote.

Rodriguez mentioned 12 ways in which the case was compromised, including the mishandling of the photographs. The FBI claimed some of the photos of Foster’s neck wound were underexposed and therefore useless but when Rodriguez found them and hand them enhanced, he was shocked to learn a blurred-out spot was described as a bullet wound.

The suicide has always been troubling for other reasons. The car Foster’s body was supposedly discovered in was not seen at the park by Patrick Knowlton, who was supposedly at the park just an hour before Foster allegedly committed suicide. In addition, Foster’s fingerprints weren’t found on the gun he supposedly used and the autopsy report did not include X-rays of Foster’s body.

Conspiracy theories aside, the photographic evidence discovered is enough to warrant serious questions. It leads to many unanswered questions beginning with Clinton’s role in past scandals that include Whitewater and the White House Travel Office.

It’s possible that a pesky private email server might be the least of Clinton’s worries now.

 

From WND

WASHINGTON – It’s been 23 years since Deputy White House Counsel Vincent Foster was found dead in a Virginia park, setting off one of the biggest controversies of the Clinton administration.

Foster, a close friend and former law partner of Hillary Clinton’s, was discovered on July 20, 1993, lying in Fort Marcy Park with a fatal gunshot wound.

Two investigations, the first led by Robert Fiske and the second by Kenneth Starr, concluded Foster suffered a single, self-inflicted wound. A simple suicide. Case closed.

But newly discovered evidence unearthed from boxes stored deep in the National Archives lend credence to theories about foul play and cover-up that have been hinted at by at least three books and countless articles.

The newest piece to the puzzle was uncovered by two citizen researchers, one of whom was a witness involved in the case from the beginning.

What had only been suspicions about missing death-scene photographs are now listed as facts in public documents.

The smoking-gun information comes from two documents: a two-page letter of resignation and a 31-page memo both written by Starr’s lead prosecutor, Miguel Rodriguez.

Rodriguez refers in his letter to photographs showing a wound on Foster’s neck – a wound that did not exist according to accounts in Starr’s official government report.

The obvious questions: How could a suicide victim be found with two wounds – a .38-caliber gunshot into the mouth that exited through his head and another wound on the right side of his neck that one of the paramedics described as a small-caliber bullet hole? And why would the government investigators go to great lengths to cover it up?

Another question some will be asking is about Hillary Clinton’s embattled presidential run. Can it survive renewed scrutiny into one of the darkest clouds that hovered over her husband’s administration – especially considering her close friendship with Foster and the fact that her aides were seen rifling through files in Foster’s White House office just hours after his body was found?

The newly discovered evidence has actually been sitting, unnoticed or ignored by the media, in the National Archives and Records Administration for years. In 2009, two documents created by Rodriguez were discovered in the archives by researchers Hugh Turley and Patrick Knowlton.

But Knowlton was not just any amateur researcher. He was a grand-jury witness who happened to be in Fort Marcy Park the day Foster died and noticed discrepancies that were never addressed by Starr’s report.

Allan Favish, a Los Angeles attorney who took a Freedom of Information Act case all the way to the Supreme Court seeking access to photographs of Foster’s body as it lay in the park, said he started looking into the case shortly after Foster’s death in 1993.

It was Favish who brought the National Archive discoveries by Turley and Knowlton to the attention of WND.

“It all started in the mid-1990s, not too long after Foster’s death, and I saw on the Internet, which was very unsophisticated at the time, some people posting things about the death,” Favish told WND. “Hugh Turley was involved very early on along with Knowlton.”

A rush to judgment

Rodriguez’s resignation letter to Starr dated Jan. 17, 1995, says he was quitting because evidence was being overlooked in a rush to judgment in favor of suicide and closing the grand-jury investigation..

Rodriguez mentioned the existence of original photographs showing a wound to Foster’s neck – the same photographic evidence Favish had been seeking in legal battles that stretched from 1997 through 2004. Favish’s request for the missing photos, filed under the Freedom of Information Act, was ultimately denied in 2004 by a unanimous decision of the U.S. Supreme Court.

Read Favish’s brief filed August 2003 at the Supreme Court.

The Rodriguez letter blows holes in the government’s conclusion that Foster’s body had a single self-inflicted gunshot wound.

“At meetings and via memoranda, I specifically indicated my disagreement that there existed ‘overwhelming evidence’ that Foster committed suicide where he was found at Ft. Marcy Park,” Rodriguez wrote to Starr in his resignation letter.

‘New photographic evidence’ cited

Rodriguez went on to cite 12 ways the investigation was compromised.

Witness statements had not been accurately reflected in official FBI reports, he told Starr.

Even more troubling was the treatment of death-scene photographs.

Four paramedics recalled seeing Foster’s neck wound when they had their memories “refreshed” by “new photographic evidence,” Rodriguez told Starr. Rodriguez indicates the FBI had originally shown these witnesses “blurred and obscured blowups of copies of (Polaroid and 35mm) photographs.”

What the FBI had apparently done was to use a Polaroid camera to take pictures of the original Polaroid pictures, essentially producing blurry “copies of copies.”

The FBI claimed some of the original photos taken by Park Police had been under-exposed and were basically useless. But when Rodriguez found the original images buried in a file, he took them to an independent photo lab used by the Smithsonian Institute and had them enhanced. He was astounded at what they showed. What had once been a blurred spot on the neck, possibly a blood stain as claimed by the FBI, was now clearly something much more.

One of the paramedics, Richard Arthur, described it as a bullet hole about the size of a .22-caliber round.

In January 2001 Favish filed a motion requesting permission to take a deposition from Rodriguez so he could question him about the photos. His motion was denied by a U.S. District Court judge in Los Angeles and ignored by the appeals court in D.C.

Railroaded out of job

Rodriguez went on to explain in his resignation letter that immediately after he produced the new photographic evidence he came under personal attack by Starr’s staff.

“After uncovering this information, among other facts, my own conduct was questioned and I was internally investigated,” Rodriguez wrote. “I steadfastly maintained, and continue to maintain, that I, at all times, conducted myself as an experienced and trained prosecutor, with years of federal prosecutorial experience and federal grand jury experience.”

Rodriquez concluded that he believed there was sufficient evidence “to continue the grand jury inquiry into the many questions surrounding Foster’s death.”

Instead, he was told the grand-jury probe would be abruptly ended and his work would be placed under review.

“In effect, for raising the above questions, I was forced out of my job,” he wrote to Starr.

He ended his resignation letter to Starr with a stinging epithet:

“I no longer believe in the dynamics of the decision-making process presently employed in your Washington, D.C., office.”

The other key document found in the National Archives is a 31-page memo from Rodriguez that also refers to the second wound on Foster’s neck.

At pages 18-19 of the memorandum, Rodriguez stated that one of the photos “clearly depicts a dark, burnt appearing, blood area on VF’s neck.”

He further stated that he reminded one of Starr’s deputy counsels that “only two identical sets of 18 polaroid photographs were provided to OIC [Office of Independent Counsel]. One photo clearly depicts a dark, burnt appearing, blood area on VF’s neck. The D.C. medical examiner who observed the photo stated that, if the picture were cropped and without knowing more, the burnt blood patch looked like a bullet hole or puncture wound. Based on my own experience and training I am confident the traumatized area was caused by a ‘stun-gun’ or ‘tazer’ [sic] type weapon.

“In addition, I pointed out that the third EMT to the body, EMT [Richard] Arthur, concluded that there was a puncture wound or bullet wound on VF’s neck. I offered that such wound(s) would explain the upper right shoulder blood.”

Rodriguez’s findings from the enhanced photographs were never included in the Starr report. Read More

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