Students Replace ‘Under God’ With ‘Under Allah’ In Pledge

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Rocky Mountain High School in Colorado has to deal with a lot of controversy right now because of specific students who changed the words of the pledge of allegiance. Instead of saying, “one nation under God” they changed it to, “one nation under Allah.” People are justifiably outraged over this.

Members of the Cultural Arms Club are the ones who read it. The pledge of allegiance is recited every Monday morning before class begins. The Principal Tom Lopez is dealing with a lot of backlash and complaints from parents who say that exchanging God and Allah is unpatriotic. Which it is.

But Lopez disagrees and gave a statement showing why,

“These students love this country. They were not being un-American in trying to do this. They believed they were accentuating the meaning of the words as spoken regularly in English.”

Communications Director Danielle Clark said,

“We understand not everybody would agree with the students’ choice. We’ve heard there are some who are upset.”

That sounds like a nice way of saying, we heard you but we disagree with you and so we do not care and will continue doing what we want. Which is what they planned to do all along. Clark further defended the exchange of God and Allah in the pledge by saying that the Cultural Arms Club has also in the past spoken it in French and Spanish. Not just Arabic. Her argument is thus that it is not a statement about Islam or Arabic but about inclusivity and not exclusivity.

Most students have expressed public support for all their classmates who partook in the reciting of the pledge in Arabic. They said that the club simply promotes cultural awareness and destroying barriers and boundaries. Thus they believe that their classmates did nothing wrong.

Lopez made a further statement when he said,

“I’ve been shocked with prejudicial statements that have been made. I’ve been shocked with the lack of seeking understanding. There’s definitely suspicion and fear expressed in these people’s minds. There’s some hate.”

What is your opinion on this situation? Since the Club also recited the pledge in Spanish and French too does this get them off the hook for showing openness to numerous different languages and cultures? Or is it inappropriate to disrespect the pledge by speaking it in anything other than English? Comment below and on social media.