Video Depicts U.S. Military MREs, Uniforms, And Weapons Found In Area Held By ISIS

isis-us-aid
In Iraq, it is widely believed that Obama created and supports the Islamic State to sow chaos in the region. The irony is that the conspiracy theories that the US created and aids ISIS are stoked by the newly empowered Iran (thanks to Obama), which backs powerful militias and political parties with active media operations. Iran continues to play us like a fiddle.

Such conspiracies run rife through Iraqi society because Obama’s policies have been ridiculous and incoherent. The fact is that Obama created the threat by leaving Iraq precipitously and giving an opportunity to this group. He has armed the Syrian rebels — many of these arms fell into the hands of ISIS, and the Syrian rebels he armed have the same jihad goal that ISIS does. But in Iraq, these people he has supported and armed become the enemy.

U.S. has spent $7BILLION on 5,000 air strikes against ISIS targets… but still struggles to convince Iraqis it doesn’t support terror group

U.S. airstrikes have helped Iraqi forces roll back ISIS over past two years
But newspapers and TV networks repeat conspiracy theories that the U.S. created the jihadi group to sow chaos in the region to seize its oil
The U.S. government spent $10 million on public outreach in Iraq last year
But it appears to have made little headway in dispelling such rumors
Many still blame the chaos after the 2003 invasion that toppled Saddam Hussein on American malice rather than incompetence

By Associated Press, 8 May 2016 (thanks to TIP):

For nearly two years, U.S. airstrikes, military advisers and weapons shipments have helped Iraqi forces roll back the Islamic State.

The U.S.-led coalition has carried out more than 5,000 airstrikes against ISIS targets in Iraq at a total cost of $7 billion since August 2014, including operations in Syria. On Tuesday, a U.S. Navy SEAL was the third serviceman to die fighting ISIS in Iraq.

But many Iraqis still aren’t convinced the Americans are on their side.

Government-allied Shiite militiamen on the front-lines post videos of U.S. supplies purportedly seized from ISIS militants or found in areas liberated from the extremist group.

Newspapers and TV networks repeat conspiracy theories that the U.S. created the jihadi group to sow chaos in the region in order to seize its oil.

in this Wednesday, May 4, 2016 photo, Iraqis watch the news on a television at a cafe in Sadr city in Baghdad, Iraq. For nearly two years, U.S. airstrikes, military advisers and weapons shipments have helped Iraqi forces roll back the Islamic State group but many Iraqis still aren't convinced the Americans are on their side. (AP Photo/Karim Kadim)

in this Wednesday, May 4, 2016 photo, Iraqis watch the news on a television at a cafe in Sadr city in Baghdad, Iraq. For nearly two years, U.S. airstrikes, military advisers and weapons shipments have helped Iraqi forces roll back the Islamic State group but many Iraqis still aren’t convinced the Americans are on their side. (AP Photo/Karim Kadim)

The U.S.-led coalition has carried out more than 5,000 airstrikes against ISIS targets in Iraq at a total cost of $7 billion since August 2014 but many Iraqis still aren’t convinced the Americans are on their side

Despite spending more than $10 million on public outreach in Iraq last year, the U.S. government appears to have made little headway in dispelling such rumors.

An unscientific survey by the State Department of Iraqi residents last year found that 40 percent believe that U.S. policy is working to ‘destabilize Iraq and control its natural resources,’ and a third believe America ‘supports terrorism in general and (IS) specifically.’

Skepticism about U.S. motives is deeply rooted in Iraq, where many still blame the chaos after the 2003 invasion that toppled Saddam Hussein on American malice rather than incompetence.

Despite spending more than $10 million on public outreach in Iraq last year, the U.S. government appears to have made little headway in dispelling such rumors.

An unscientific survey by the State Department of Iraqi residents last year found that 40 percent believe that U.S. policy is working to ‘destabilize Iraq and control its natural resources,’ and a third believe America ‘supports terrorism in general and (IS) specifically.’

Skepticism about U.S. motives is deeply rooted in Iraq, where many still blame the chaos after the 2003 invasion that toppled Saddam Hussein on American malice rather than incompetence.

The conspiracy theories are also stoked by neighboring Iran, which backs powerful militias and political parties with active media operations.

Among the most vocal critics is al-Ahad TV – a 24-hour satellite channel funded by Asaib Ahl al-Haq, an Iranian-backed militia allied with the Iraqi government.

The channel airs front-line reports and political talk shows where the allegedly harmful role of the U.S. government frequently comes up.

In this Thursday, May 5, 2016 photo, people read newspapers in Baghdad, Iraq. For nearly two years, U.S. airstrikes, military advisers and weapons shipments have helped Iraqi forces roll back the Islamic State group but many Iraqis still aren't convinced the Americans are on their side. (AP Photo/Karim Kadim)

In this Thursday, May 5, 2016 photo, people read newspapers in Baghdad, Iraq. For nearly two years, U.S. airstrikes, military advisers and weapons shipments have helped Iraqi forces roll back the Islamic State group but many Iraqis still aren’t convinced the Americans are on their side. (AP Photo/Karim Kadim)

Newspapers and TV networks repeat conspiracy theories that the U.S. created the jihadi group to sow chaos in the region in order to seize its oil. Above, people read newspapers in Baghdad, Iraq, on May 5

The U.S. ‘aims at weakening Iraq and the Arab world as well as the Shiites,’ al-Ahad’s spokesman Atheer al-Tariq said.

‘They spare no efforts to destabilize Iraq and neighboring countries in order to continue selling weapons and strengthening their presence in the region through establishing more military bases,’ he added.

While supervising the channel’s war reporting last year, he claimed to have witnessed incidents when U.S. forces helped IS. As Iraqi security forces prepared to enter the city of Tikrit in April, he said two U.S. helicopters evacuated senior militants.

A few months later, during an operation to retake the Beiji oil refinery, crates of weapons, ammunition and food were dropped over militant-held territory, he said.

‘Is it logical to believe that America, the source of technology and science, could fire a rocket or drop aid materials in a mistaken way?’ he asked.

Videos uploaded to social media by front-line militiamen purport to tell a similar story.

One shows U.S. military MREs, ‘meals, ready-to-eat,’ as well as uniforms and weapons said to have been found in an area held by IS. Another shows the interrogation of a captured IS militant.

‘Check out his boots, they are from the U.S. army,’ a fighter says. Another fighter points to a pile of rocket-propelled grenades he says were made in the U.S. and shipped to IS.

In this Wednesday, May 4, 2016 photo, Iraqis watch the news on a television at a cafe in Sadr city in Baghdad, Iraq. For nearly two years, U.S. airstrikes, military advisers and weapons shipments have helped Iraqi forces roll back the Islamic State group but many Iraqis still aren't convinced the Americans are on their side. (AP Photo/Karim Kadim)

In this Wednesday, May 4, 2016 photo, Iraqis watch the news on a television at a cafe in Sadr city in Baghdad, Iraq. For nearly two years, U.S. airstrikes, military advisers and weapons shipments have helped Iraqi forces roll back the Islamic State group but many Iraqis still aren’t convinced the Americans are on their side. (AP Photo/Karim Kadim)

“For God and Country—Geronimo, Geronimo, Geronimo……..Geronimo E.K.I.A.” -U.S. Navy SEAL VI